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Cricket- The DRS System

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 13, 2013 by jackpinnock

DRS, known as the Decision Review System, is a technology based system used to review controversial decisions made by on-field umpires in the subsequent scenario of the batsman being dismissed. There are two main components of the DRS system. Firstly, there is Hawk Eye, which is ball tracking technology that plots the trajectory of a bowling delivery that has been interrupted by the batsman, and it will also determine whether the ball would consequently hit the stumps or not. The second component to the Decision Review System is Hot Spot, which is an infra-red camera devise which shows where the ball has been in contact with the pad or bat.

However, the DRS system is not in place for all international matches, and it has made many international nations rather angry that it is not a mandatory tool. Firstly, in the rules and regulations, is the decision of the international boards whether or not to include the DRS system and not the International Cricket Council (ICC). Secondly, with the use of the DRS system, there is no real need for the umpires, as video technology alone can determine the correct decision of a piece of controversial incident that has happened in a Test match.

One nation that is rather sceptical about the DRS system’s accuracy is top ranked nation in the ICC rankings, India. England have a four day tour of India coming up and are not to pleased with India, because of the exclusion of the DRS system. The Indian board feel that the Hawk Eye and Hot Spot technology is not up to professional and is sometimes inaccurate. However, from my perspective, I think that this excuse is rather pathetic, as most nations are in favour of this technology. Furthermore, I truly believe that many other sports, like Football, can learn from this and introduce technology, especially Hawk Eye into their respective sports.

However, without the technology, broadcasters still use it for their productions so that viewers can see the contentious decisions made by the umpires without the technology, and maybe, this could be classed as acceptable. There is one fundamental reason why broadcasters take advantage of the umpires not using it, entertainment. Cricket, and all other sports, is a perfect platform for controversy, and for broadcasters to use this in there productions create many talking points and drama. This increases the viewing stats, and therefore, more people watch more one day internationals.

On the basis of all of these points, the question beckons, should the DRS system be used in all competitions? From my perspective, I think it should, solely because it creates a level playing field, and with the game of Cricket being surrounded by match fixing, I think that the last thing that Cricket needs is more controversy on and off the field.

 

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